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The Trial of Kyle Bosman is a major event in the history of Easy Allies. After losing a bet, Bosman took advantage of the loopholes in the contract that Michael Huber had made him sign, which led to other Allies stepping in and settling the score between the two.

E3 Bets Showdown

Main article: E3 Bets Showdown

The Contract

BosmanTrial-Contract

The contract, as shown in the E3 Bets Showdown video.

I, Kyle Bosman, agree to the terms set forth within this document in regards to the proposed stakes outlined by Michael Patrick Huber during the Easy Allies "E3 Bets Showdown". I will stream live a complete full playthrough of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past from a new save slot until the ending credits on Easy Allies Twitch page in no more than three sessions finishing no later than July 8, 2016. Three minutes prior to each stream I will tweet from my own personal Twitter account @KyleBosman the following quote with no less, and no more words or symbols attached: "I'm about to stream my favorite game of all time, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. #Masterpiece". Upon full completion of the game I will discuss my favorite parts of the game for no less than three minutes on "Huber Syndrome".


Bets Results

BosmanTrial-BetsResults

Kyle Bosman losing the Bets Showdown.


Playthroughs

First Session

BosmanTrial-Session1

Bosman being Bosman.

Kyle Bosman started playing A Link to the Past as he would normally, narrating the game's introduction and giving comments on anything that caught his attention, such as the fact that Link lived with his uncle but there was only one bed in the house. He named his character "HUBER", mocking the person who made him play in the first place, and proceeded to start the game. He picked the Lamp from the chest inside the house, but after going outside, he saved the game and ended the stream after a mere 5 minutes, stating that it was all he could take. Having only two sessions remaining, many people believed he had dug his own grave.


Second Session

BosmanTrial-Session2

Xelna's speedrun from SGDQ 2015.

The following night, Kyle Bosman started streaming once more. He began by explaining about the bet he lost and the contract that Michael Huber had made him sign, stating he should "stream a full playthrough of A Link to the Past". However, based on that sentence, and to the surprise of all the people present, he picked a playthrough from Summer Games Done Quick and began streaming it in a corner of the screen, while in the meantime he played Skyward Sword, occasionally paying attention to the game he was supposed to be playing.

During the stream, several people from the chat, including Michael Damiani, pointed out that the playthrough he chose did not contain ending credits, as the contract specified. He struggled for a while to find a playthrough that met all the requirements: starting from a new save file, containing ending credits, and being the English version of the game (as the Japanese one is called Triforce of the Gods). After many tries, he finally found a speedrun by MchanPlayz, and continued to play the other Zelda game on the Wii.


The Trial

Judge

Bailiff

Prosecution

Defense

Witnesses


Testimonies

Arguments Counter-Arguments
The contract specified that Mr. Bosman had to tweet about the stream three minutes prior. However, there is visual evidence that proves that he had made the tweet at 12:35 AM, and that the stream had started a minute earlier, at 12:34 AM. According to Mr. Huber, by not fulfilling his signed obligation, he had nullified the contract. Mr. Bosman had declared that he started the stream with a notice that he would "start soon". He claimed that he made the tweet afterwards and waited for three minutes, as specified in the contract.
Mr. Bloodworth's cite about the covenant of good faith and fair dealing suggested that Mr. Bosman should have followed the assumption that, whether or not the word "play" was in the contract, Mr. Huber wanted him to play the game himself. Furthermore, Mr. Bloodworth declared that Mr. Bosman should've assumed that the word "stream" implies playing the game. Mr. Jones and Mr. Bosman had clarified that the word "stream" does not imply playing a game, as proved by the Easy Allies' E3 2016 coverage, and the streaming of the trial itself. Also, according to Mr. Jones, it was Mr. Huber's responsibility to be as clear as possible in the contract, as he should've known that Mr. Bosman would be looking for loopholes within it.
The contract specified that the game should be started from a new save slot. Mr. Bloodworth quoted the Merriam-Webster and Webster's College dictionaries, stating that the word "new" means "not old", "never existing before" and "produced for the first time". Evidence points out that the file in question was created on, or before, June 2nd. Mr. Jones claimed that the save was new when it was created, and based on the language of the contract, it qualified as such.
Pizza arrived. Sophie barked.
Mr. Casanova took the stand to point out that, according to the audience, Mr. Bosman streamed a video of the game and not the game itself. However, he believed that Mr. Bosman was within his legal rights and didn't breach the contract. Furthermore, he claimed that "the moral quandary and the societal stigma that goes along with being labeled a welcher" may had had an impact on Mr. Bosman and he could've change his mind about being innocent.
Mr. Damiani was reminded by the audience that the playthrough Mr. Bosman streamed did not contain ending credits. However, he reminded the audience that 45 minutes into the stream he chose another playthrough that fulfilled all the requirements set by the contract. Also, he believed Mr. Bosman to be a good and honest man, and that he wouldn't do this kind of thing in his right mind. Mr. Damiani then declared temporal insanity for Mr. Bosman, pointing out that he was delirious and didn't even know what day it was. Mr. Huber objected on that fact questioning Mr. Damiani's background on psychological well-being, but he cited his many years of expert analysis of the lore of Kingdom Hearts and its fandom, and his dealing with the most intriguing people in countless anime conventions.
Mr. Hinck's written testimony was brought to the attention of Judge Ellis. It was then read by Mr. Jones.

"If the tweet actually went out 3 minutes before the stream itself started, and the playthrough Bosman used shows that it starts from scratch, and there's no doubt of the new save file being used, and it shows all the way through the end credits, I think Kyle legally did not breach the contract, which is hilarious. But the issue of the temporal and universal definition of the word "new" is raised. Is a save file considered "new" if it had existed prior to Bosman's stream? The save file was new for that playthrough, but not new in a linear sense of time, and not new for Bosman's stream. However, the contract does not specify and is vague, especially in that regard, so I think that any argument one way or the other on that point is inadmissible. Thus, it is my opinion that Bosman is not legally in breach of this contract. He is guilty of being a master troll."

Being a fan of both A Link to the Past and Kyle Bosman, Mr. Moore told the audience that he was looking forward to watch Mr. Bosman play the game and hearing his insightful critique as to why he doesn't like it. Mr. Moore felt let down and empty about not being able to learn something new about the game in a different perspective.
Mr. Bosman took the final word to question Mr. Huber's honor about their past bets, not just in Easy Allies, but in GameTrailers as well. He pointed out that Mr. Huber contacted other Allies about the contract prior to the Showdown, and that he had later modified it based on their feedback. Mr. Huber stated that the contract Mr. Bosman had signed was not the same, and was not shown to anyone beforehand.
Continuing Mr. Bosman's final statements, he claimed that Mr. Huber did not honor his past losing bet about wearing a t-shirt with the word "guitars" on it in every video or livestream for a month, and finishing the streams by saying that word. Also, he reminded the jury of the bet in which Mr. Huber had to play three songs on his clarinet, and that he demanded an extension of the deadline because he did not practice enough.
Mr. Huber then called Mr. Bosman to the witness stand. Judge Ellis approved it, but he only allowed one question. Mr. Huber appealed to Mr. Bosman's honesty, and asked him if he truly had "interpret the contract as streaming somebody else's full playthrough". Mr. Bosman simply stated that his "interpretation of the contract was presented in complete on the night of July 3rd", in actuality the morning of July 4th, the day of the streaming in question.


Outcome

BosmanTrial-Verdict

The jury's verdict.

After all testimonies were heard, a poll was created for the jury to vote. A few minutes later the results were in, declaring the defendant, Kyle Bosman, guilty as charged.

Judge Ellis then proceeded to read Mr. Bosman's sentence: he would continue the stream by playing the game, in a maximum of three sessions, with a deadline extension granted beforehand by Mr. Huber. However, much to the surprise of the audience and everyone in the court, Mr. Huber declared that he would be streaming the game in the defendant's place, stating that Mr. Bosman wasn't worthy of playing it.

The defendant was then granted a closing statement, in which he declared that he would be back for the next Bet Showdown, and that he wouldn't sign a contract from Mr. Huber ever again. Mr. Huber snapped at this claim, challenging not only Kyle Bosman but everyone in the court to a match for the Slusser Cup, mimicking the WWE's Money in the Bank event.


Archive

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